Pringles Can Inventor Buried In His Own Package

I remember my mother buying “Pringle’s Newfangled Potato Chips” sometime in the 1976. It was not long before when everyone at my school was bringing in these tube cans of chips that all looked exactly alike. I didn’t like them because of that. Every Pringles looked just like the other and tasted that way too. Where was the diversity?

Pringles are a brand of potato snacks produced by Procter & Gamble. Pringles were first sold in the United States in October of 1968; they were not rolled out across America until the mid-1970s. The name was chosen from a Pringle Avenue in Finneytown, Ohio because it had pleasing sound.

According to the patent , Pringles were invented by Alexander Liepa of Montgomery, Ohio. Science Fiction and Fantasy author Gene Wolfe developed the machine that cooks them. It’s famous logo is a stylized representation of a man with a large moustache and parted bangs.

Pringles are especially known for their packaging invented by Fred Baur, which consists of a tubular can with a foil-coated interior, and a resealable plastic lid. It is Fred Baur who has taken his Final Taxi, but that taxi takes the shape of one of his famous designed cans. For Baur has asked for his ashes to buried in one of the iconic cans.
The man who designed the Pringles can had part of his cremated remains buried in one, his family says.

Fredric J. Baur, of Cincinnati, was an organic chemist and food storage technician who specialized in research and development and quality control for Cincinnati-based Procter & Gamble Co.

Baur filed for a patent for the tubular Pringles container and for the method of packaging the curved, stacked chips in the container in 1966, and it was granted in 1970, P&G archivist Ed Rider said.

The 89 year old inventor’s children said they honored their father’s request to bury him in one of the cans by placing part of his cremated remains in a Pringles container in his grave in suburban Springfield Township.

The rest of his remains were placed in an urn buried along with the can, with some placed in another urn and given to a grandson.

My question is: was Baur buried in a 170g, 163g, 50g, or 23g size can?

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